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Japanese Knotweed


Japanese knot-weed is a non native invasive plant that was introduced into Britain from the far east in the mid-nineteenth century as an ornamental plant.
Over time it has become a widespread national problem in all range of habitats, including roadsides, riverbanks, derelict buildings and gardens. It out-competes all our native plants and animals.

No seed has ever been recorded in the UK except as a result of hybridisation,this means the plant regenerates from rapidly growing rhizome system and also from any fresh stem material.
As little as 0.7g of rhizome or 10mm of fresh stem can produce and regenerate into a new plant.

IDENTIFICATION
• Lush green in colour
• Heart shaped leaves
• Is very similar to bamboo
• Produces white flowers around September / October
• Deep red blushes /spots over stems

HOW IT SPREADS
It spreads through its crown, rhizome (underground stem) and stem segments, rather than seeds.
The weed can grow over a metre in a month, it is a very invasive plant and it can grow through and damage concrete, tarmac whilst damaging buildings and roads to destruction.
Studies have shown that a 1cm section of rhizome can produce a new plant in 10 days.
Rhizome segments can remain dormant in soil for twenty years before producing new plants.

Useful information
• Deal with any Japanese knot-weed rapidly to prevent spread to neighbouring areas and property.
• Treatment is required at least three times a year especially in late summer/autumn, this must be done by a licensed, fully trained contractor
• Cut back dead stems in WINTER ONLY (dead brown stems) use a contractor as spreading the stems can cause more problems the following year.
• Japanese knotweed stems will die back in winter but chemical control usually takes a minimum of three years to totally eradicate this invasive plant. Therefore the knotweed must still be regarded as infective within that three year period, or whilst regrowth still occurs during spring.

Japanese Knotweed and the Law:
• Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981) – It is an offence to plant, or cause knotweed to grow in the wild.
• Environmental Protection Act (1990) – Cut knotweed material and soil containing rhizome material are classified as controlled waste and must be disposed of safely at a licensed landfill site, if removed from the site of origin.
• Third party litigation – Landowners can be sued for costs and damages if they fail to prevent knotweed from spreading to a neighbouring property. Also failure to manage and dispose of Japanese knotweed responsibly may lead to prosecution.

WE CAN ADVISE YOU ON THE MOST SUITABLE WAY OF TREATING JAPANESE KNOTWEED.

PLEASE CALL, EMAIL, FOR ADVICE AND A FREE NO-OBLIGATION QUOTE

 
 
   
 

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